For the 2013 JVA report post, see this post.

The numbers below are for the category 日本のアニメーション(一般向け) which the official translated reports list as “Animation for Grown-ups Domestic” though 一般向け more means “general public”. I assume they’re defining the general public as “not kids”. But it’s not strictly late night anime, as the numbers really show once you get to unit counts.

2001-2013 report: http://www.jva-net.or.jp/en/genre_2001-2013_en.pdf (EN)
2014 report: http://www.jva-net.or.jp/report/genre_2014.pdf (JP)

2001-2014, sales in millions of yen

Year Total ¥ Share vs Last DVD ¥ DVD % BD ¥ BD % VHS ¥ VHS % Other ¥ Other %
2014 64,352 28.0% -13.7% 24,102 38% 40,250 62% 0 0% 0 0%
2013 74,580 29.6% 11.4% 29,124 39% 45,456 61% 0 0% 0 0%
2012 66,956 25.9% -2.3% 30,392 45% 36,564 55% 0 0% 0 0%
2011 68,517 26.2% -2.1% 37,219 54% 31,298 46% 0 0% 0 0%
2010 70,008 26.3% 3.1% 44,351 63% 25,583 37% 0 0% 0 0%
2009 67,920 24.8% -3.5% 55,442 82% 12,128 18% 0 0% 350 1%
2008 70,383 24.6% -12.2% 65,901 94% 4,454 6% 0 0% 28 0%
2007 80,176 25.3% 0.1% 80,176 100% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
2006 80,116 24.2% -3.9% 79,565 99% 0 0% 551 1% 0 0%
2005 83,405 22.5% 41.9% 80,487 97% 0 0% 2918 3% 0 0%
2004 58,785 15.7% -11.3% 52,786 90% 0 0% 5999 10% 0 0%
2003 66,245 18.9% -11.1% 57,067 86% 0 0% 9203 14% -25 0%
2002 74,520 23.0% 73.2% 55,078 74% 0 0% 19571 26% -119 0%
2001 43,037 14.5% 11.2% 37,568 87% 0 0% 5972 14% -503 -1%

2001-2014, sales in units

Year Units Share vs Last DVD DVD % BD BD % VHS VHS % Other Other %
2014 12,976,748 16.4% -17.3% 6,516,266 50% 6,460,482 50% 0 0% 0 0%
2013 15,706,682 19.1% 18.3% 7,935,344 51% 7,771,338 49% 0 0% 0 0%
2012 13,273,126 15.7% -8.4% 7,395,302 56% 5,877,824 44% 0 0% 0 0%
2011 14,490,855 17.6% -2.6% 9,094,449 63% 5,396,406 37% 0 0% 0 0%
2010 14,873,977 16.5% -5.2% 10,376,365 70% 4,446,176 30% 0 0% 51,436 0%
2009 15,689,547 17.9% -6.4% 13,569,193 86% 1,874,684 12% 0 0% 245,670 2%
2008 16,757,885 19.5% -5.2% 15,983,864 95% 759,253 5% 0 0% 14,768 0%
2007 17,668,466 18.3% -1.4% 17,668,466 100% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0%
2006 17,918,005 17.0% -2.8% 17,800,432 99% 0 0% 117,573 1% 0 0%
2005 18,430,346 16.1% 45.6% 17,838,260 97% 0 0% 592,086 3% 0 0%
2004 12,658,023 11.5% -5.5% 11,569,191 91% 0 0% 1,088,832 9% 0 0%
2003 13,389,524 14.1% -22.3% 11,591,254 87% 0 0% 1,803,117 13% -4,847 0%
2002 17,243,046 20.2% 85.1% 12,800,184 74% 0 0% 4,464,588 26% -21,776 0%
2001 9,313,338 12.1% 14.5% 7,874,049 85% 0 0% 1,480,374 16% -41,085 0%

Comments
1. BD is still ever so slightly behind DVD in raw unit numbers (extending out to a decimal place, it’s 50.2% to 49.8%) but catching up, and 2015 will almost certainly be the first year that BD overtakes DVD here. In terms of revenue, BD is a clear winner at 62%, a slight increase over last year.

2. Japanese animation for adults/general public continues to have a much much higher degree of BD dominance than anything else – except for one huge outlier this year: foreign animation for adults/general public, which is where Frozen ended up being counted. Because that was released as a DVD/BD bundle that got categorized under BD, it almost singlehandedly pushed that category to be ~80% BD with the 2.3 million units it moved by the end of 2014 (61% of the entire category, more if these are shipped numbers and you figure Frozen’s shipments are a good bit higher), and nearly tripled the category over 2013.

3. As usual, don’t underestimate everything we’re not seeing through Oricon. Particularly through the intentionally limited subset of series I track on this website. The aggregate total sales of every disc with a release date in 2014, per my spreadsheet, is 3,979,973. That’s less than 1/3rd the 12,976,748 being reported by JVA. [Update 2016-07-22: Factoring in the extended rankings, which we didn’t have when I posted this, it’s now 4,537,410 out of 12,976,748 but that’s still only 35%.] Obvious reasons are that the 4m number:
• Isn’t including any pre-2014 releases selling in 2014
• Is almost exclusively late night anime, while the JVA category is undoubtedly much broader
• Misses anything that didn’t make Oricon’s extended ranking
• Is subject to the usual Oricon undercounting
• Would only represent sales (estimates), which would of course be less than shipped numbers, if that’s what JVA is using
• Rental! It’s not as prevalent as it used to be but it’s still a significant part of the industry and not covered by Oricon

The point is, there’s a whole lot more to the industry than what the usual late night anime sales tracking community either can or is interested in covering and this is important to remember. Heck if you go by my spreadsheet, 2014 releases are the second highest since 2004 (first year I have full coverage for) in total units sold. So different sources sliced in different ways tell different stories.

4. Caveats aside, per JVA’s tracking 2014 was a step back from 2013, but 2013 was unusually strong. 2014 is fairly close to, albeit still a touch lower than, 2012. Remove 2013, and units sold is an unbroken decline every year from 2005 onward. But that’s not unique to anime, that’s just the state of physical media. If anything the category we’re focused on is maintaining a very large and growing share of the entire video disc market; if not for Frozen it would almost certainly have climbed to over 30% this year. No category will weather the storm of changing viewing patterns forever, but anime will last longer than anything else.

 

Once again, just a general disclaimer that bears a reminder: the late night anime I track on this site does not track 1:1 to this genre category. It would be contained within it, but other things will count in it as well. You cannot use these numbers to measure with perfect accuracy the performance of late night anime as a whole.

16 Responses to “JVA 2014 DVD/BD market report, update and 2001-2014 comparison”

  1. Avatar Paul von Oberstein says:

    2014 must have been hideous year for anime industry. Record number of series produced and lowest revenue since 2001. There are lots of people hurting real bad right now.

    • something something says:

      There are many different aspects to “the anime industry” and we don’t even have a clear definition of what JVA counts as 日本のアニメーション(一般向け). Not to mention this is only disc sales and informs us in no way as to how all other revenue sources performed. Given the promotional nature of many anime adaptations, you can’t evaluate anime without considering those.

      And given the declining relevance of physical media it’s not like we should expect disc sales as a whole to keep increasing. 2013 was a major exception to an ongoing trend, and if we compare 2014 to 2012 instead, it looks more like a continuing trend than a shocking about-face. It is true that there were nearly 200 shows last year, but we have to consider the number of shorts, and how many fall under kids shows, and how many were dependent on disc sales or not. It’s… complicated.

      • Avatar Ejc says:

        Adding on to what something said, many big franchises nowadays are not just limited to disc sales. They are multimedia franchises…

        Let us consider Love Live! for example. We know it was the best seller of 2014 (let’s say it did around ¥2,500,000,000 to be conservative since its average was ~60K by the end of 2014), but then the band of μ’s had total artist sales of ¥2,183,100,000 in 2014 (which included the music sales and 3rd&4th concert BD+DVD, but not the anime BD sales since they are labelled as “アニメーション” rather than “μ’s”). To give context to this figure, the top 2 was Arashi and AKB48 with total sales of ¥13,823,400,000 and ¥13,075,200,000 in 2014, and in 2010… Houkago Tea Time managed ¥1,588,000,000 in total sales… part of another big franchise, K-ON!.

        Then the mobile game sales are also not considered, where Klab Games (the company handling LL School Idol Festival aka Sukufesu), had a big turnaround in their finances comparing 2013 and 2014. A summary of their finances:

        Total sales: ¥20,909,300,000 (2013) vs ¥21,307,400,000 (2014)
        Operating income: -¥1,202,300,000 (2013) vs ¥2,106,300,000 (2014)
        Ordinary income: -¥904,100,000 (2013) vs ¥2,506,400,000 (2014)
        Net income: -¥2.506,300,000 (2013) vs ¥1,709,300,000 (2014)

        Klab Games cited this huge turnaround due to the 2 seasons of the anime, and in turn the mobile game also brought in new fans for the music and the anime itself. The School Idol Diaries light novels also sold 246,579 units in total in 2014 at ¥842 each = ¥207,619,518, but not as significant as the mobile game and music sales.

        Just considering the disc sales, really under-reports just how much multimedia franchises actually makes… which makes just considering the anime industry based on disc sales very limited in itself. We have other big franchises such as UtaPri, K-ON!, Madoka, you name it… K-ON!, Madoka, Gundam, etc, especially made billions in merchandise sales!

  2. Avatar primadog says:

    Should add rental sales in your bullet points. There’re still almost 4 thousand of those in Japan:
    http://jva-net.or.jp/report/joiningshop.pdf

  3. Avatar Nexxkinn says:

    What exactly happened at 2009 at the “other” sales? It suddenly rose and suddenly fall after that.

  4. Avatar Hahalollawl says:

    So is it fair to say that the market trend seems to be very strongly indicative of a decline/contraction? Even if the decline is slower than other areas and the market share is growing, I’m not sure that qualifies as “good” news. Those other areas are probably less dependent on disc sales for profits though aren’t they? How long do you think it will be before the market forces production committees to either adopt a different business model, or significantly reduce the number of shows?

    • Avatar Paul von Oberstein says:

      Based on two first seasons, the number of new shows this year is already less than last year.

    • something something says:

      That physical video disc sales are in decline has been a worldwide economic fact for nearly a decade, so that much is undeniable.

      But again, it’s got a lot to do with how you slice and dice the data. Like I said, based on the specific subset of anime that we track on this site, last year actually moved more discs than any year besides 2013. There is of course some reporting bias, as sales reporting in recent years is better/more complete than in previous years, but even so it still means the idea of a decline *in this specific sector* for discs released last year is a lot less certain that it appears through JVA’s not-quite-equivalent numbers.

      So the issue as I see it is really the number of shows. That divides the increased unit sales over more series, which probably results in lower averages. The number of shows also results in bad working conditions, bad scheduling, more outsourcing, and poorer pay. But it also indicates that the purpose of anime as a promotional tool for other media is just getting stronger. It’s the Kadokawa model: just animate as much as possible and see what sticks (and boosts the novels). The few hits try to pay for the many flops, and suddenly it becomes very difficult for us on the outside to tell how everything is going on the inside.

      The industry really needs to find a way to survive on less shows, for its animators’ well-being (ans the production quality of its shows) if nothing else. But less shows means less shots at scoring that huge hit. So I do think there’s a method to the current madness and the overwhelming emphasis on multi-media experiences means these disc sales numbers will only get harder and harder to meaningfully evaluate, not easier.

      • Avatar Paul von Oberstein says:

        Making less shows means less money to everybody. Not a recipe for success.

        What anime industry needs is to break to mainstream audience outside kids’ demographics.

        • something something says:

          The total amount of money isn’t what matters, the total amount of profit is what matters. More shows does not necessarily mean more profit (and it definitely encourages low pay and poor working conditions).

          But evaluating this all based on disc sales alone is, as I say over and over, inadequate.

  5. Avatar primadog says:

    AJA finally put their 2014 industry report on their website:
    http://aja.gr.jp/?wpdmdl=598

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